Commercial Lighting Tampa Florida

Best Wishes and Happy New Year!! To a very Prosperous 2018!!!

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May your holidays be Bright and Merry!! From our family to yours!

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So, what is DLC 4.0?

Manufacturers were required, as of Sept. 1, to submit all products for a new, more stringent set of efficacy standards, otherwise known as DLC 4.0. With this new standard, the gap between those standard and premium products will be even greater as DLC calls manufacturers to higher lumen-per-watt, or light output per energy consumption, standards. Just as important, products that no longer meet the DLC 4.0 standards will be de-listed on Apr. 1, 2017.
Here is an outline of the changes and how they may affect your lighting:
1. The primary update to DLC was in regards to the efficacy of all DLC-qualified LED products
LED lighting technology has improved immensely over the last five years, and the attention of the manufacturers has turned toward the efficiency of their drivers and their products’ performance. Efficacy, usually expressed in lumens per watt (LPW), is now a leading parameter for what type of rating will be given to a product, whether Standard or Premium. The more efficient the product, the more lumens (measured light output) you will get out of your wattage.
Let’s take a linear LED troffer as an example. Currently for that product to be DLC Premium, it must achieve 110+ LPW. With the revisions in June 2016 and the new products hitting the QPL in January 2017, the new requirement is 125+ LPW. The reasoning behind this change is to differentiate between the mass amount of product that currently qualifies as DLC.
2. Utility companies are going to follow this revision with their incentive programs
One of the reasons these DLC changes should be paid close attention to is that it will affect the amount of utility rebates you will receive. Utilities need to find unique ways to take energy off the grid, and offer rebate programs to commercial businesses for lowering their electrical load.

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Wishing a Happy Thanksgiving and safe weekend from our family to yours!

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

DON’T THROW THAT AWAY! HOW TO DISPOSE OF LIGHT BULBS THE RIGHT WAY

When your light bulbs burn out, where do you put them? Do you chuck them in the trashcan without giving it a second thought? If so, you’re like some other people who assume burnt out light bulbs always belong in the trashcan, or in your recycling bin along with other glass items. But, that’s not necessarily the right way to dispose of light bulbs.

Light bulbs have come a long way from incandescent to fluorescent to LED bulbs; and, with so many different light bulbs available on the market, it can be tough to keep track of which ones you should recycle and which ones you can safely throw away. This brief guide provides information on what to do with your old light bulbs. Read on for more information.

How to dispose of incandescent light bulbs

Incandescent light bulbs typically do not contain toxic chemicals, so you can throw them away with your regular trash. You do, however, need to be careful of glass shards, just as would when throwing away any other glass objects. It may be a good idea to surround your old incandescent bulbs in plastic or other old packaging materials prior to putting them in your trashcan.

If you want to recycle your old incandescent light bulbs, you may have options available to you. For instance, Home Depot has a recycling program, which accepts old incandescent holiday light strings. Ikea also has a recycling program, which accepts “used regular light bulbs.”

How to dispose of CFL and fluorescent light bulbs

Unlike incandescent bulbs, CFL bulbs (or Compact Fluorescent Light bulbs) contain a small amount of mercury. Each bulb contains about four milligrams of the toxic metal. Although that is only a fraction of the amount of mercury in those old school thermometers, broken CFL bulbs can be damaging to the environment if they enter landfills or the water supply.

To dispose of your CFL bulbs properly, recycle them. You can take them to any Lowes store, for instance, and there is usually a place to recycle your CFLs near the front entrance. Other home improvement stores and recycling centers in your area may also accept your CFL bulbs.

You may see long, tube-shapes florescent bulbs in your office. Or, you will even see them in closets, older kitchens, or garages. Like CFL bulbs, fluorescent bulbs contain mercury, so you should recycle them.

Before you remove a burnt-out tube, it is wise to turn off the electrical at the circuit for that part of your home to avoid injury. Also, it’s a good idea to wrap your fluorescent bulbs in an old packing material to help prevent them from breaking.

HOW TO DISPOSE OF LED LIGHT BULBS

Light emitting diode, or LED, light bulbs are about 90 percent more efficient than incandescent bulbs. The electrical current passes through a microchip, which lights up tiny LEDs.

LEDs do not contain hazardous chemicals, so it is safe to throw them away in the trashcan. However, some of the components in LED bulbs may be recyclable. So, it’s a good idea to contact your recycling company to see if they will accept your LEDs.

How to dispose of halogen light bulbs

You often see halogen bulbs outside, where people use them as floodlights. Halogen light bulbs are a more advanced form of incandescent bulbs. They are stronger and they are designed to withstand higher pressure than incandescent bulbs. You can safely dispose of halogen bulbs along with your regular household trash, or contact your local recycling center to see if they accept halogen bulbs.

How to repurpose old light bulbs

You can use old bulbs to make a variety of art projects. You can paint your light bulbs to make holiday ornaments, wrap them in twine or yarn to create fruit for a centerpiece, or you can break them into pieces and create mosaic art projects. Here are a few other cool light bulb art project ideas we’ve seen:

Snow globes
Flower vases
Oil lamps
Hanging wall decorations
Spiders or glass animal figurines

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Wishing everyone a safe and Happy Labor Day 2017!!!

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

Changing your light bulb could help you sleep better

Changing your light bulbs could change your sleeping habits.

According to a new study, replacing regular light bulbs with a special bulb that emits less blue light could help you fall asleep faster.

More than a third of Americans say they don’t get the recommended minimum of seven hours of sleep a night.

Michael Breus is a clinical psychologist and a specialist in sleep medicine. “Blue is bad for sleep,” Breus told “CBS This Morning” on Thursday.

“So it turns out that there’s a very particular wavelength of light that’s blue and when it hits certain cells in your eye called melanopsin cells it tells them to turn off the melatonin faucet in your brain. Well, you kind of want that faucet on when you’re falling asleep.” Melatonin is a naturally-occurring hormone that helps regulate a person’s sleep cycles.

Customized LED bulbs like the Good Night bulb selectively reduces blue light, boosting melatonin and reducing alertness.

In addition to light bulbs, apps like Flux and the Night Shift mode on the iPhone filter blue light out of the screen based on a timer.

“We really need to start thinking about light as medicine,” Breus said. “Light, it affects all aspects of our health, it affects us in lots of different ways. You know, just like there’s junk food I think there’s junk light.”

REF: CBS This Morning

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Hurricane Harvey Donations

Keeping all of our customers and their families in Houston, Louisiana and all other areas affected by Hurricane Harvey, in our thoughts and prayers.
Please do what you can to help out those affected by this tragedy, every little bit helps. You can donate directly to the American Red Cross at the link listed below.

https://www.redcross.org/donate/hurricane-harvey?scode=RSG00000E017&utm_campaign=Harvey&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1LeW-K2B1gIVW0wNCh2imgsBEAAYASAAEgLn6fD_BwE&gclsrc=aw.ds&dclid=CLy0o6eugdYCFQg2hwodzVEFdg

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Happy 4th of July 2017!!!

Commercial Lighting Tampa wishes everyone a safe and Happy Independence Day with all of your loved ones!

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

The Economy-Changing Power of the LED Bulb

Energy-efficient lighting has resulted in striking cost savings for Americans. And it’s just the beginning.

Per-capita electricity use peaked in the U.S. in 2007. With the exception of a post-recession rebound in 2010, it has declined every year since. I already wrote a column about this epochal shift last month, but the chart that went with it is so remarkable that I’m going to recycle it here.

Past the Peak, and Falling
U.S. annual per-capita electricity generation, in kilowatt-hours

Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration
What caused the decline? I offered several possible explanations. One of them was increased efficiency of electrical appliances. Several readers wrote in to suggest that perhaps it was the lightbulb that did it. Thomas Edison’s incandescent bulbs are being pushed aside by energy-efficient light-emitting diodes, aka LEDs, and that had to have had an impact on electricity use.

I’d been meaning to follow up on this. Then, in a blog post Monday, economist Lucas Davis of the University of California at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business beat me to it. The residential portion of the decline in electricity use, at least (my chart above includes commercial and industrial use), can be attributed largely to LEDs and other energy-efficient lighting:

Over 450 million LEDs have been installed to date in the United States, up from less than half a million in 2009, and nearly 70% of Americans have purchased at least one LED bulb. Compact fluorescent lightbulbs (CFLs) are even more common, with 70%+ of households owning some CFLs. All told, energy-efficient lighting now accounts for 80% of all U.S. lighting sales.

LEDs use 85 percent less electricity than incandescent bulbs. Going on an estimate of 1 billion LEDs and CFLs now in U.S. homes, operating three hours per day, Davis estimated an energy savings so far of 50 billion kilowatt-hours per year, or 160 kilowatt-hours per capita, which was about equal to the decline in residential consumption he found. The total decline in my chart above comes to 1,161 kilowatt-hours per capita, which still leaves a lot of electricity savings to explain away — but LEDs and CFLs are surely cutting electricity use in commercial and industrial settings, too.

The savings are really just getting started. LED bulbs were in fewer than 30 percent of U.S. homes in 2015, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration, and constituted the majority of bulbs in fewer than 5 percent. After crunching the numbers from a September government report on the energy impact of solid-state lighting, veteran energy lawyer Steve Huntoon wrote in utility trade publication RTO Insider in January that over the next 20 years, LED lighting would:

reduce annual retail electric sales by 300 billion kWh under a “current path” and by 435 billion kWh under a more aggressive path.

Three hundred billion kilowatt-hours amounts to about 8 percent of 2016 retail electricity sales for all uses; 435 billion kilowatt-hours is almost 12 percent. Rooftop solar, meanwhile, is expected to generate 100 billion kilowatt-hours a year in 20 years. Here’s Huntoon again:

For all the attention given rooftop solar as environmental boon, new age investment and regulatory flashpoint, the LED bulb is three times more significant.

Economist Davis cautions, though, that there could be something of a “rebound effect” from LED adoption: As LEDs make lighting cheaper and less, well, bulb-oriented, we’ll find more things to light up:

Outdoor lighting, in particular, would seem particularly ripe for price-induced increases in consumption. These behavioral changes may take many years to manifest, as homeowners retrofit their outdoor areas to include additional lighting.

I guess we should also consider the risk of political backlash. You may recall the pro-incandescent-bulb campaign waged by congressional Republicans early this decade. “I think Thomas Edison did a pretty patriotic thing for this country by inventing the lightbulb,” former U.S. Representative Michele Bachmann famously said in 2011. At that point the main alternative to Edison’s bulbs was still compact fluorescent lamps, which had their detractors. Since then, though, LED bulbs have flooded the market, and their price has steadily declined. 1 It seems a little too late for an incandescent comeback now.

Finally, in case you were wondering: The LED was invented in Syracuse, New York, in 1962 by a scientist at the company Edison founded, General Electric. So, yes, using LEDs is patriotic, too.

This column does not necessarily reflect the opinion of the editorial board or Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Halogen bulbs, which are somewhat more energy-efficient than incandescent bulbs but much less so than LEDs, have actually taken more of incandescents’ market share so far than LEDs have. But the future almost certainly belongs to the LEDs.

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