Commercial Lighting Tampa Florida

Happy 4th of July!! Have fun and be safe from Commercial Lighting Tampa!

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New Incandescent policy for the State of California


For more information visit:
www.nrdc.org/policy
www.facebook.com/nrdc.org
www.twitter.com/NRDCEnergy

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-436-3466 / 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8134363466 / 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

Happy Memorial Day 2018!


Remember those who have served and continue serving their country in the military! Hope everyone is enjoying time with their loved ones. Remember and Honor…Memorial Day 2018

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-436-3466 / 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8134363466 / 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

Hey California, say farewell to your traditional incandescent light bulbs

Here’s a primer on the new rules that will banish them from stores shelves before long

They date back to the time of Thomas Edison. They’ve provided decades and decades of warm bright light to our homes and workplaces. And they’re about go bye-bye.
On Jan. 1, 2018, the humble everyday incandescent light bulb will reach a milestone in its long and steady fade into our collective memory. Under environmental regulations that take effect that day, the bulbs burn too much energy to be sold in California; stores will be able to exhaust current supplies, but they will eventually run out. For consumers, that means choosing among more efficient bulbs that use no more than 72 watts, including halogen incandescents, compact fluorescents and light-emitting diode, or LED, bulbs.

This is not the first time the state has focused its regulatory glare on what have been the primary bulbs in many homes for more than a century. Check out this Associated Press story lede from January 2011: “Beginning Jan. 1, the state began phasing out certain energy-sucking bulbs, federal standards the rest of the country will enact next year.”

In other words, it’s deja vu all over again.

“We still have a few incandescent bulbs, but they’re being phased out,” said Dave Butts, a customer service rep at Richert Lumber, an Ace Hardware outlet in Pleasanton. “The LEDs are so much better these days and people have gotten so used to them that the incandescents were going to go away anyway,” regardless of any government regulation. Plus, said Butts, “they are also more expensive than the more energy-efficient LEDs, which use a fraction of the energy the traditional bulbs were using. So that means a lower PG&E bill, too.”

Butts said that when LED bulbs first started selling a few years back, many people found their light too bright and too harsh. “They were fine for a workshop or an operating room,” he said, ”but not for reading a book.” But over time, the LEDs have found more acceptance, especially as manufacturers began producing the so-called ”soft white” versions. “You can still buy the super-bright ones,” said Butts, “but you also have that other option with the warmer, softer light.”

While the California Energy Commission’s website can be fairly user-unfriendly and tough to navigate, consumer-advocacy groups like the San Francisco-based Natural Resources Defense Council have stepped in to help guide you through your next bulb-buying binge:

What’s going on here?

As part of the 2007 national energy bill passed by Congress with bipartisan support and signed into law by President George W. Bush, energy efficiency standards were established for new light bulbs that ensured a smooth and gradual national transition to energy-saving bulbs. California’s regulations make the transition happen a little faster.

Why are the old incandescent bulbs going away?

Those common, screw-based light bulbs must meet a minimum energy efficiency level that’s three times more efficient than the old incandescent bulbs as of Jan. 1 in California (and nationally as of 2020). No incandescent or halogen bulb on the market comes close to meeting that level.

So then what?

California consumers will be choosing between energy-saving CFL and LED light bulbs in California stores as of Jan. 1.

Will the bulbs vanish from shelves overnight?

No. Retailers will be allowed to sell what they’ve got left, but then they must stock those shelves with the bulbs that meet the state’s new and tougher environmental standards. The people making and selling light bulbs have known about this coming change for more than ten years now and they’ve responded to the challenge by offering a complete suite of new energy-saving light bulbs that meet the new standards. They’re also winding down their manufacture of incandescents.

Is this a good thing for California consumers?

Do the math: With around 250 million sockets in California that still contain inefficient bulbs, the savings should really add up, says the NRDC. “Once all of these sockets switch over to a more efficient alternative – CFL or LED light bulbs – California consumers and businesses will save an estimated $1 billion every year on their electric bills.”

Which bulbs are covered?

The standards apply to most medium screw-based bulbs used in our homes and businesses, including the ubiquitous pear-shaped bulbs used in table and floor lamps, the globe or round bulbs of more than 40 watts used in bathroom vanities, and the candle-shaped lamps of more than 40 watts used in chandeliers and sconces.

Will it be easy to find replacements?

A wide assortment of energy-saving LED bulbs in every shape and light output level already can be found on the shelves of leading retailers across the state. These bulbs are from well-known lighting companies such as Philips, GE, and Sylvania as well as newer companies that specialize in efficient lighting such as Cree, TCP, Feit, and Maxlite. California’s light bulb regulations currently exempt some types of bulbs, such as those used in ovens.

Finally, the first LED bulbs were a turn-off to many consumers because of their harsh bright light. What now?

LED bulbs are as bright as the inefficient bulbs they replace, says the NRDC, “and provide the additional benefits of lasting up to 25 years under normal operation of three hours per day. Most LEDs are also dimmable, and some of the newer LEDs can even be controlled remotely through a cell phone app. LEDs are so efficient that they use roughly 80 percent less energy than the equivalent incandescent.”

REF: The Mercury News

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-436-3466 / 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8134363466 / 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

This levitating light bulb is what’s missing from your home

Levitating decor items like plant holders and Bluetooth speakers are the thing to have right now — but there’s one other floating gadget on the market that really shines (if you catch our drift). What do you get when you combine the words fly, light, and the Swedish word for float? Um, only the coolest decoration of all time.

Meet Flyte: the gravity defying, levitating light bulb that will leave you and your guests mesmerized. Thomas Edison would be shook right now.

Levitating decor items like plant holders and Bluetooth speakers are the thing to have right now — but there’s one other floating gadget on the market that really shines (if you catch our drift). What do you get when you combine the words fly, light, and the Swedish word for float? Um, only the coolest decoration of all time.

Meet Flyte: the gravity defying, levitating light bulb that will leave you and your guests mesmerized. Thomas Edison would be shook right now.

Flyte takes the common light bulb and merges it with magnetic levitation, allowing it to hover and rotate above its platform for hours. Feel the electromagnets lock it into place, take your hands away, and voilà: gravity defying light.

Unlike the common light bulb, Flyte doesn’t need a switch, wires, or even batteries. It’s powered through the air by induction: a green alternative to the average energy-sucking bulb. Thanks to Nikola Tesla, we can use the electromagnetic field and mercury particles to create a fluorescent, UV light (and forget the electrodes that cause lightbulbs to burn out quickly.) Along with induction, Flyte uses energy efficient LED lights that can last up to 50,000 hours. That’s 12 hours a day for 11 years. Insert jaw drop.

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-436-3466 / 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8134363466 / 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

Amazing 117 year old Light bulb still burning bright for fire fighters.

Worlds longest burning light bulb still providing light for the fire fighters of Fire Station 6 in Livermore, California. This hand blown carbon filament Shelby bulb was first used by the fire department in 1901. Today it can be seen live on the Livermore Bulbcam.
http://www.centennialbulb.org/cam.htm

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-436-3466 / 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8134363466 / 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

This is the only Alexa and Google Assistant-enabled light bulb that costs less than $10

Being able to control your light bulbs using Amazon Alexa or Google Assistant is awesome. Having to pay $25 or more for each voice assistant-enabled bulb is not awesome, however. Luckily, we found a top-rated option that couldn’t be any more affordable. The Sengled Element Classic A19 Smart LED Light Bulb costs a penny under $10, and it works just as well as any other voice-controlled bulb we’ve come across. Definitely check it out.

Here are some key details from the product page:

SMART HOME INTEGRATION: connect the bulb Amazon Echo Plus, as well as Samsung SmartThings and Wink hubs. The bulb can also be added to any Sengled Element Starter Kit. (Classic or Plus, hub sold separately. A hub is required for bulb use.)

VOICE CONTROL INTEGRATION: connect the bulb to your favorite hub to use with Amazon Alexa and Google Assistant (hub required for use)

CONTROL YOUR LIGHTS, AT HOME OR AWAY: use the iOS or Android app to set lighting schedules, dim or turn your lights on and off. Control your lights remotely and have the lights on before you get home at night.

MONITOR ENERGY USE: monitor electricity use (kWh) from anywhere from the iOS or Android app. See if you forgot to turn off the lights, then remotely turn off for added savings.

ENERGY EFFICIENT: LED bulbs use 80% less energy than incandescent lighting. Sengled bulbs last for over 20 years and are ENERGY STAR certified. Kits and bulbs come with a three-year warranty.

Commercial Lighting Tampa FL, 813-436-3466 / 813-935-4448 / 813-514-1264 / 813-514-1265 / 813-932-1086 / 813-932-1547 / 813-935-8235,CommercialLightingTampa.com, 8134363466 / 8139354448 / 8135141264 / 8135141265 / 8139321086 / 8139321547 / 8139358235

Why you should switch to LED lightbulbs right now, before the law requires it


When Jason Chroman relocated from San Francisco to the suburbs, he and his family moved into a bigger, newer house. It was all very exciting until their first electric bill arrived. “The house was maybe 30 percent bigger, but the electric bill was something like 200 percent more,” Chroman said. So he started looking around to figure out what could be using so much power. He found the answer when he looked up: “Because it was a new house, it had a lot of recessed lighting, all of which was incandescent,” he said.

Chroman is the vice president of finance at a Silicon Valley start-up called Tubular Labs, so he put the money skills he honed on the job to work at home. The question: Since LED lightbulbs cost more but use less energy, how soon would they pay for themselves? He was surprised to find that because of California’s high energy prices, he could recoup his costs in less than two months. “When I figured out the economics of each bulb, I upgraded all the bulbs in the house,” Chroman said. “It cost me a bundle, but my power bill went down by about half. I was blown away by how much electricity lighting consumes.”

The federal government caught on to the high cost and energy consumption of lighting in 2007 and passed a law decreeing that lightbulbs must be three times more efficient by the year 2020. Congress didn’t outlaw the old-fashioned “Edison” lightbulb — so named because it’s what we’ve used since Thomas Edison’s time — but it may as well have, because no incandescent bulb comes anywhere close to meeting the new standard. States then had the choice to accelerate the change, and California moved ahead with it. Starting this New Year’s Day, California retailers must exhaust their supply of incandescents and then sell only bulbs that meet the new standard, which means LEDs and compact fluorescent lightbulbs. The rest of the nation will follow in two years.

Chroman’s home is big and his power rate high, but even for a more average home, the numbers are compelling. The average American house uses 40 lightbulbs. The average rate for electricity is 13 cents per kilowatt hour. If all 40 lightbulbs were 75 watt incandescent, which is pretty typical, you could convert to 11 watt LEDs to get the same amount of light. Let’s say you leave all 40 lights on five hours a day. In this scenario, homeowners would save $600 a year by switching lightbulbs from incandescent to LED.

But what about the cost of the bulbs themselves? When LEDs first came on the market, there was serious sticker shock. LED spotlight bulbs, for example, once cost as much as $100. No more. I scanned the Internet and found plenty of LED bulbs available for $5 apiece, and they can cost less, thanks to rebates offered by power companies. By comparison, incandescent bulbs cost about a dollar each, although prices will probably increase as they become scarce because of the government requirement. Prices vary, but let’s call the difference in cost between a basic LED and an incandescent bulb $4. According to the math above, the monthly usage savings for a single bulb is $1.25. So most people will be able to recoup the cost of a new LED bulb in just over three months.

In addition to saving money, LEDs can save you time — with fewer trips to the store and up the ladder. They last about 25,000 hours. That’s more than 13 years, if you keep your lights on five hours a day, as in the example above. By comparison, incandescent bulbs last just 1,200 hours, and compact fluorescents, 8,000 hours.

And, of course, LED bulbs save energy. That’s what the government was after in the first place. There is less stress on your wallet, but also less strain on the electric grid.

To take advantage of the cost-time-energy savings, there may be a few more objections to overcome. Here goes:

Color: The early LEDs often shed a cold, bright-white light. Newer LED bulbs are branded as “soft white” or “warm white” that glow just like an old-fashioned incandescent. Look for a color temperature of 2,700 Kelvin.

Shape: LED bulbs are now available for almost any purpose. In addition to regular bulbs and spotlight-style bulbs, chandelier-shaped bulbs, three-way bulbs and even Christmas lights are on the market.

Dimming: Many LED bulbs are dimmable, unlike early LEDs and compact fluorescent lightbulbs, or CFLs, the vast majority of which still are not dimmable.

Quality: Not all LEDs are created equal. To know you are purchasing LEDs with the maximum benefits, look for the Energy Star label. This means they meet standards for brightness, color quality, efficiency, steadiness and immediate lighting when switched on.

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Best Wishes and Happy New Year!! To a very Prosperous 2018!!!

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May your holidays be Bright and Merry!! From our family to yours!

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